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Data Management Plan (DMP)

Questions to ask yourself

Data Retention

  • How long should it be retained? (e.g. 3-5 years, 10-20 years, permanently)
  • Are you aware of TRUSpace?

Data Sharing

  • Any sharing requirements? e.g., funder data sharing policy
  • Have you chosen a repository in which to archive your data?

Publication

  • When and where will the work be published?

Responsibility

  • Who in the research group will be responsible for data management?
  • Who controls the data (PI, student, lab, TRU, funder)?

Cite and Get Credit

Datasets require citations for the same reasons as journal articles, books, proceedings, and so on: to acknowledge the original author/producer and to help other researchers find the resource.

Cite Others

A dataset citation includes the same components as any other citation:

  • Author
  • Title
  • Year of publication
  • Publisher (For data sets,  this is often the archive where it is housed.)
  • Edition or version
  • Access information (a URL or other persistent identifier).

Unfortunately, there is no uniform standard or guideline for citing datasets.

Get Cited

Research data in an open access repository is findable and citable.

In addition, you can create a free account on ORCiDImpactStoryResearchGate, or  Google Scholar, etc.  You can add links in your profile to unique URIs (or DOIs) of your datasets, just as for other publications.

 

Publish

Sharing your valuable research data after the project is complete is an avenue that more and more researchers are taking. Some publishers are increasingly requiring authors to make available the data that support their results published in accepted articles:

Sharing data allows new research that builds on what has come before, without other researchers having to duplicate the same work. It also legitimizes your work and allows others to verify your research and conclusions. Ultimately, sharing your data serves as a public good to academia and future research.

TRU Library hosted solutions: At TRU Library, we offer TRUSpace, a cross-disciplinary campus institutional repository where final small datasets can be stored. 

External repositoriesre3data.org is a directory tool for helping people identify and locate either disciplinary or institutional repository to share research data. Your liaison librarian can advise on available repositories in your field or contact Kathy Gaynor, Scholarly Communications Librarian.

 

License

A license defines what others may or may not do with your data. You may choose to assign a broad license that allows anyone to do whatever they like with your data, or you may assign a narrower license that restricts use to strictly non-commercial activities and requires attribution to the data creator each time it is used.

The two primary sources for licenses are Creative Commons and Open Data Commons. Open Data Commons (ODC) offers three license options that were created specifically for data/databases:

  • ODC Public Domain and Dedication License – imposes no restrictions on the use of your data/database. Others are free to copy, distribute, and use your work; produce works from your data/database; and to modify, transform, and build upon the data/database.
  • ODC Attribution License – allows others to copy, distribute, and use your work; produce works from your data/database; and to modify, transform, and build upon the data/database, as long as they provide you proper attribution.
  • Open Database License – allows others to copy, distribute, and use your work; produce works from your data/database; and to modify, transform, and build upon the data/database, as long as they provide you proper attribution and any new works created are made available under this same license.